Tag Archives: Peugeot

F1Weekly podcast # 722

NASIR BRINGS BACK MORE INTERVIEWS FROM THE INDYCAR SERIES OPENER IN ST. PETERBURG FLORIDA AND THE 12 HOURS OF SEBRING. ON THIS EPISODE WE FEATURE AN INTERVEW WITH INDYCAR OWNER DALE COYNE AND…HERE ARE SOME WORDS FROM PADDY LOWE ON THE F1 SEASON OPENER DOWN UNDER.

Paddy Lowe:
It is an exciting time of year for everyone in Formula One including the huge number of fans around the world, as we head to Australia for the first race of the season. This year is particularly exciting as the regulations have changed substantially concerning the bodywork of the cars and the dimensions of the tyres, so we expect to see quicker cars and far more challenging racing for the drivers.

Coming back to the paddock has that feeling of being “back to school” after our winter away: everybody energised for the new season ahead, meeting friends again and welcoming new faces. I always feel that the first qualifying session of the year is the most intense and interesting hour in the entire Formula One calendar, as that is the point when all the smoke and mirrors of winter testing must stop and the real pace is finally put on the table. It is only then that we will see how the cars and drivers perform and get our first true indication of the season which will unfold.

The race itself is always eventful with more than the usual degree of incident and car failure as the cars and drivers engage in their first competition of the year. And the spectators bring extra enthusiasm to Albert Park, many of them having come from all over the world to see this first race of the F1 season. From a technical point of view, the tyres for this year’s race are not only wider but also softer – having the ultrasoft in play at Melbourne for the first time – so we will without doubt see some record breaking lap times this weekend and perhaps more evidence of driver fatigue in the race than we have seen in recent years.

For me personally, I’m very happy to be back at Williams, the team where I started my Formula One career. We have a very talented group of people here and two great drivers with whom I haven’t worked before, so I’m looking forward to stepping into the paddock with them in Melbourne to start the 2017 season.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

DTM

THE TECHNOLOGY OF THE 2017 DTM CARS: MORE POWER AND LESS DOWNFORCE REPRESENT A BIGGER CHALLENGE FOR THE DRIVING SKILLS THAN EVER

To let the skills of the drivers gain even more importance, the technical regulations for the 2017 season were revised in crucial areas. So, the horsepower output of the new cars was increased while the aerodynamics were restricted at the same time. This means that driving this year’s cars is a bigger challenge and the drivers have to work even harder.

The technology of the 2017 DTM cars differs from the one of its predecessors in several significant areas:

The engine
In 2017, the four-litre V8 engines of Audi, BMW and Mercedes-AMG will produce – for the first time – more than 500bhp. The increased horsepower output mainly was achieved by bigger intake-system air restrictors. The engines are equipped with one air restrictor per cylinder bench and their diameter has been increased from 28 to 29 millimetres. Furthermore, the new regulations allow for enhancement in special intake-system areas special areas to optimise the engine’s performance even more. Nonetheless, maximum longevity still represents a top priority of the DTM engines’ design. Blown engines are extremely rare in DTM and usually, the engines survive the entire season. During the course of the season, cost-intensive engine revisions aren’t allowed in DTM as the sealed engines only may be subjected to services in this period of time, according to the regulations.

Aerodynamics
The guidelines of the new regulations comprise a reduction of the aerodynamics. To achieve this goal, the geometry of the front splitter, underbody and rear diffuser was changed and the ride height was increased.

Meanwhile, the rear wing and the DRS (Drag Reduction System) make for a major and visible difference. The DRS allows the driver to reduce his vehicle’s drag for a short time, thus increasing its top speed. In the past this made for many battles and overtaking manoeuvres. Other than last year’s rear wing that could be hinged down completely, only the so-called Guerney Flap, the upper of two fins of the rear wing, is flapped down what even increases the DRS efficiency.

The tyres
Combined with the new Hankook tyres that provide more grip for a short period of time but force the drivers to cope with a higher performance decrease over the distance, these changes make for a handling of the new DTM cars that is clearly more demanding for the drivers than it was in the past.

New control components
The body design of this year’s DTM touring cars of Audi, BMW and Mercedes-AMG complies with the latest generation of their production brethren. To restrict the cost-intensive high-tech developments, the new regulations feature clearly more areas for jointly developed control components. The development of these components is controlled by the umbrella organisation ITR in close cooperation with the manufacturers’ engineers. For 2017, the range of control parts was extended – inter alia – by components for the suspension area. Furthermore, the DTM control wheel also will make its debut. From this year, all the 18 cars will race on ATS wheels while every manufacturer could opt for the wheel it preferred, in the past.

Drivers feel pleasant anticipation
After the first tests for the 2017 season, the drivers proved to be really happy with their new cars. “The changes made on the car are clearly noticeable – particularly the combination of less aero, more power and the new tyres,” said Mattias Ekström, the senior driver on the DTM grid, representative of all the DTM drivers. “As I see it we are heading in the right direction and I think we are going to have a lot of fun, this year.”

The testing was continued this week at Vallelunga, Italy from 14th to 16th March, and many of the components were subjected to acid tests for the coming season.

In addition to the alterations on the technical regulations, those responsible also intensely work on the sporting regulations. Next week ITR is going to inform on the planned changes for the coming season that will be kicked off at Hockenheim from 05th to 07th May.

INDYCAR SERIES

FLORIDA FRESH. FIRESTONE GRAND PRIX OF ST. PETERSBURG.

BOURDAIS AND COYNE RACING ARE HOT ON A COOL BREEZY DAY.

The 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series got off to a great start with the opening round won by Sébastien Bourdais over French countryman and 2016 IndyCar champion Simon Pagenaud. Scott Dixon was third, the Kiwi still not successful here after 13 attempts.

Penske-star Will Power started from his seventh St. Pete pole position, next to him was Dixon, the Ganassi team now powered by Honda. Josef Newgarden, the man from Tennessee, qualified on the second row in his first drive for Penske. Sato-san was fifth, having jumped from Foyt’s stable to Andretti Autosports.

Setback & Comeback

Sébastien Bourdais crashed his Coyne operated car in qualifying and was relegated to the back of the grid. Compadre Pagenaud also did not fare well, qualifying only 14th.

Power led the first few laps before the Mayor, James Hinchcliffe, laid down the law and took the lead. This was just the beginning of Power’s problems; a puncture, running over air hose and fuel-feed issues led to his retirement.

Bourdais avoided tangle with other competitors and on lap 37 passed Pagenaud for the lead. The Penske driver started his charge in the closing stages of the race but the ex-Toro Rosso F1 racer kept his cool and gave Coyne racing team a well deserved win, a very happy reunion not only for the two and but also for the driver and crew chief Craig Hampson – the last time they worked together was in their glory days at Newman-Haas.

Behind Dixon in third, Florida native Ryan Hunter-Reay and Takuma Sato completed the top five.

Victory for Le Mans-native & St. Pete-based Bourdais was 36th of his stellar career on this side of the pond and elevates him to 6th on the all time wins list.

Look back

Paul Tracy was the winner of the inaugural St. Petersburg event in 2003, then held under the CART umbrella. Helio Castro Neves is the only three-time winner of the event, 2006/7 & ‘12. And, surprisingly, Graham Rahal is the only American winner.

Penske has been the dominant team here with eight wins, but their winner from the past two years, Juan Pablo Montoya, was missing in action but will be activated by the Captain and self ‘percolated’ during the merry month of May.

American heavy weights in Indy Lights

The future of IndyCar racing is bright as two young Americans won their first race in the series in dominating fashion. The season opening race was led from start to finish from pole position by Wisconsin native Aaron Telitz. Last season he won the Pro Mazda (formerly Star Mazda) championship.

F1Weekly will feature an exclusive interview with this young talent in an upcoming podcast.

On Sunday, second generation and 16-year-old driver Colton Herta took victory after a race long duel with Santiago Urrutia, the Uruguayan driver is in his second year in the series. Colton made papa Bryan proud by becoming the youngest ever winner in Indy Lights history.

— Nasir Hameed

Photo: IndyCar.com

WRC

KRIS MEEKE TAKES CONTROL OF RALLY MEXICO

Despite being shorn of half of the planned stages, day two of Rally Mexico nonetheless served up plenty of twists and turns. Keeping out of trouble, Kris Meeke and Paul Nagle ended the rally’s first full leg in the overall lead. In the second Citroën C3 WRC, Stéphane Lefebvre and Gabin Moreau moved up to sixth place.

– Held up by a road traffic accident unrelated to the rally, the convoy of trucks transporting the race cars from Mexico City to León remained stuck on the road for several hours overnight. The organisers were therefore forced to cancel SS2 and SS3.

– In the middle of the afternoon, the competitors were finally able to attack the gravel stages. The leg began with the famous El Chocolate speed test, the rally’s longest stage at 54.9km. Making the most of his tyre choice – which consisted of a mix of soft and hard compound Michelin LTX Force tyres – and his road position, Kris Meeke produced a flawless performance to record his first stage win in the Citroën C3 WRC.

– Despite losing a few seconds when he stalled on Las Minas (SS5), the Briton held onto top spot in the overall standings, leading Sébastien Ogier by around fifteen seconds.

– Applying the instructions of the team, Stéphane Lefebvre adopted a pace that would enable him to build up his experience gradually. Eighth on SS4 and SS5, he moved up to the same position in the overall standings.

– The day concluded with three super special stages. After wowing the crowds gathered in the former mining city of Guanajuato, the crews then competed in head-to-head heats over two runs on the León Autodrome.

– At the end of this second leg, Kris Meeke remained first overall, having taken his lead past the twenty second mark. Meanwhile, Stéphane Lefebvre gained another two places to end the day in sixth overall.

Kris Meeke
“Everything went very well today. We clearly had a good road position, but we had to make the most of it. I didn’t push too hard, because winning isn’t my main target for the weekend. My only regret was the minor mistake I made on SS5, which cost us about eight or nine seconds. But it’s good to be running well after a pretty tough start to the season! I’ll be looking keep up the same pace tomorrow.”

LAMBORGHINI STW SERIES

JEFFRIES AND BREUKERS WIN LAMBORGHINI SUPER TROFEO TITLE AT DUBAI AUTODROME

Dubai, UAE, 5 March 2017: Championship competition heated up on the 5.39 kilometre Grand Prix Circuit at Dubai Autodrome during the penultimate National Race Days (NRD) Power Weekend (3-4 March 2017), with the new Lamborghini series on showcase with UAE national racing.

Lamborghini Super Trofeo Winter Series Middle East

The Dubai Autodrome might be a relatively unfamiliar circuit for both Axcil Jeffries and Rik Breukers, but the GDL Racing drivers mastered the track in short time behind the wheel of the exotic Lamborghini Huracán GT3. For the second round in the row, the championship leaders were flawless on their way to winning the weekend and claiming the overall title in the first season of the series.

Dutchman Breukers put the team on pole position with a best lap time of 1:57.714 and in the next two races Breukers and Jeffries fought off early challengers to break free and take comfortable victories, winning by 41.57 seconds in Race One and 20.4 seconds in Race Two, wrapping up overall and Pro Class triumphs.

The wins also secured the Lamborghini Super Trofeo Winter Series Middle East Championship for Breukers and Jeffries, making them the first winners of the inaugural series.

After receiving their championship trophies Rik Breukers of GDL Racing said, “For us it was really a great season. We put in a lot of hard work, especially together with our engineers in the final, and of course the GDL Team, everyone was working very hard, so I’m really glad it paid off.”

Young German sensation Carrie Schreiner and Aussie ace Richard Goddard spent two races trying to chase down the GDL Racing outfit, but on both attempts they had to settle for second place silverware. The German duo of Paul Scheuschner and Hendrik Still of Konrad Motorsport claimed third place in Race One while Jack Bartholomew and Devon Modell of FFF Racing Team by ACM collected third in Race Two.

The third place finish in Race One gave Scheuschner and Still a first place trophy in Pro Am Class, while Nigel Farmer and Contstantino Bertuzzi of GDL Racing claimed the next one in Race Two. When the final points were tallied, it was Scheuschner and Still who claimed the Pro Am title.

Andrew Haryanto, of yet another GDL Racing car, racked up an AM Class win in Race One but failed to finish Race Two due to a puncture, leaving his rivals Marco Antonelli and Davide Roda of Antonelli Motorsport to earn a class victory in Race Two. Haryanto wasn’t too disappointed however, as he still did enough to take home the AM Class title.

FORMULA 1

RED BULL PRE-SEASON TEST #1, VERSTAPPEN ON DAY FOUR

The final day of the first test in Barcelona marked a departure from the past three days’ activity, with the track being made wet in order to conduct testing of Pirelli’s intermediate and full wet 2017 tyres. Max Verstappen took over driving duties from Daniel Ricciardo and after testing both wet weather compounds, the Dutchman also got in some dry running on the soft compound tyre to record the day’s second fastest time with a lap of 1:21.769.

Looking back on his day’s work, and his time in the RB13 over the course of this first test, Max said: “It’s always good to run a little bit in the wet in the first week of testing. Of course, the conditions are not ideal, as the sun is shining and the track is wet, but at least we got a first idea of what the wet tyres are like. In terms of the week as a whole, the most important thing for us was to make mileage and to know that all the parts were holding up. In general everything behaved pretty well. I think Mercedes might still have an advantage on us in terms of power at the beginning of the season but we’ll be catching up. For sure the car will change quite a bit before we get to Melbourne, as it will for everyone.”

Head of Race Engineering Guillaume Rocquelin added: “While I don’t imagine anyone would say the conditions today were perfect, as some parts of the track were dry and others wet, it was still a very interesting exercise. We’re discovering new things all the time about the tyres and how they interact with the car – warm-up, degradation levels etc – so we did find out some things we wouldn’t have unless we had been through this process. Like everybody, we did most of our wet running in the morning and then later on we had the chance to get in a bit more work on slicks, which was useful. We chose not to run when the track was damp as there wasn’t really much point and we thought we might also have a recurrence of yesterday’s exhaust problem, though that turned out not to be the case. In all, it was a good test. Yes, we had a few problems, which cost us some track time, but the fundamentals are good: car control is good, the balance is good, the feel is good. That’s a good platform for next week when we’ll get into race simulations and working on the best set-up for the car. For now, though, it’s back to the factory for a pretty intense weekend of homework.”