Category Archives: Motorsport Mondial

F1weekly podcast # 417

Smooth sailing – Sepang 2009. Button and Brawn boat sailed to an easy wet victory in the Malaysian Grand Prix last year. This year the charge of the Red Bull brigade has been derailed by mechanical issues, handing Fernando Alonso debut win for Ferrari in Bahrain, and last weekend Button was the beneficiary when Vettel dropped out while leading.

This weekend’s race at Sepang is expected to have showers again, thus increasing the possibility of an unexpected winner.

Michael Schumacher and Nico Hulkenberg, the experienced and rookie rain meisters of Germany, could sure use a slippery advantage for a better showing.

Remember Monza 2008? Vettel’s sheer brilliance in the wet and Red Bull’s speed should allow the young German to notch his first win of the season. Still waters run deep and so does the talent for wet weather driving with Barrichello and Hamilton.

Alonso scored his first career pole position here in 2003 and scored an impressive victory in the 2007 race with McLaren, when the sun was still shining both on the track and driver/team relationship.

The inaugural Malaysian Grand Prix in 1999 was won by Eddie Irvine “with a little help from my friend”. Schumacher started from pole and allowed Irvine to take the lead, hoping to help his teammate for the championship against Mika Hakkinen.

Kimi Raikkonen, the “Ice cream man” from last year’s event won his first F1 race here in 2003. The Schumacher brothers bagged four wins at Sepang, three for Michael and one for Ralf.

F1weekly podcast will bring you season long coverage of F1 and feeder series like F2, F3 and GP2 & 3 championships.

— Nasir Hameed

[audio:http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/mp3.f1weekly.com/podcasts/04-01-10f1weekly417.mp3]

F1weekly podcast # 416

Dingo day afternoon in Albert Park

Australian Grand Prix


Bulls and El Matador. German wunderkind Sebastian Vettel took his
second successive pole position of the season in Melbourne, steaming
ahead of teammate and local favorite Mark Webber. Fernando Alonso,
winner of the opening round in Bahrain, qualified third in his Ferrari.

The right call. Defending race winner and world champion Jenson Button
changed to slicks, went off-track but kept his cool and smooth driving and
rewarded McLaren their first win of the season. Could this be the start of
reverse cage rattling in Woking?

Renault rising. Pole star Robert Kubica finished second. In the halcyon
days of Flavio Briatore he was at one time part of Renault Driver Development
programme. So were Kovalainen, Grosjean and Peter Windsor’s hand picked
“American” (just add Latin), Jose Maria Lopez.

Home grown talent. Mark Webber made his F1 debut in Albert Park
driving for fellow Aussie Paul Stoddard-owned Minardi team in 2002.
Sunday was no walk in the park for him, out classed by teammate both
in qualifying and race he soldiered on for ninth place finish.


Prancing in the park. Fernando Alonso, new in town in Maranello,
held off a late charge from Hamilton but was unable to pass teammate
Massa for a podium finish. His fourth place finish keeps him at the top
of the championship table.


Hulked by Kobayashi. Rising German star and Willi Weber client
Nico Hulkenberg was speared on the opening lap by the Sauber
of Kamui Kobayashi. Hulkenberg and Hamilton both won GP2 titles
in their rookie seasons and also won every championship they entered.

Unwilling Virgin. Gave birth by CFD to Nick Wirth designed cars, which
urgently needs transplant of larger fuel tanks. Sir Richard Branson of
Virgin brand fame and fortune is the rich daddy. Virgin pilots are Timo
Glock and Lucas di Grassi.


Jonesy boy. The last Australian world champion Alan Jones was born
in Melbourne. He gave Shadow their only Grand Prix win, Austria 1977,
in a car which is now owned by an F1Weekly listener. Jones was world
champion three years later in a Patrick Head designed Williams.

Party comes to town. Melbourne is one of the most popular stops on
the F1 circuit. Capital of Victoria State snatched the race from Adelaide
in 1996. Melbourne is now facing taste of its own medicine from Sydney.
Time and Bernie will decide the outcome of this opera.

Button and his Wheel of Fortune!

— Nasir Hameed

Racing regards from California

[audio:http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/mp3.f1weekly.com/podcasts/03-30-10f1weekly416.mp3]

Dingo day afternoon in Albert Park

Australian Grand Prix

Bulls and El Matador. German wunderkind Sebastian Vettel took his

second successive pole position of the season in Melbourne, steaming

ahead of teammate and local favorite Mark Webber. Fernando Alonso,

winner of the opening round in Bahrain, qualified third in his Ferrari.

The right call. Defending race winner and world champion Jenson Button

changed to slicks, went off-track but kept his cool and smooth driving and

rewarded McLaren their first win of the season. Could this be the start of

reverse cage rattling in Woking?

Renault rising. Pole star Robert Kubica finished second. In the halcyon

days of Flavio Briatore he was at one time part of Renault Driver Development

programme. So were Kovalainen, Grosjean and Peter Windsor’s hand picked

“American” (just add Latin), Jose Maria Lopez.

Home grown talent. Mark Webber made his F1 debut in Albert Park

driving for fellow Aussie Paul Stoddard-owned Minardi team in 2002.

Sunday was no walk in the park for him, out classed by teammate both

in qualifying and race he soldiered on for ninth place finish.

Prancing in the park. Fernando Alonso, new in town in Maranello,

held off a late charge from Hamilton but was unable to pass teammate

Massa for a podium finish. His fourth place finish keeps him at the top

of the championship table.

Hulked by Kobayashi. Rising German star and Willi Weber client

Nico Hulkenberg was speared on the opening lap by the Sauber

of Kamui Kobayashi. Hulkenberg and Hamilton both won GP2 titles

in their rookie seasons and also won every championship they entered.

Unwilling Virgin. Gave birth by CFD to Nick Wirth designed cars, which

urgently needs transplant of larger fuel tanks. Sir Richard Branson of

Virgin brand fame and fortune is the rich daddy. Virgin pilots are Timo

Glock and Lucas di Grassi.

Jonesy boy. The last Australian world champion Alan Jones was born

in Melbourne. He gave Shadow their only Grand Prix win, Austria 1977,

in a car which is now owned by an F1Weekly listener. Jones was world

champion three years later in a Patrick Head designed Williams.

Party comes to town. Melbourne is one of the most popular stops on

the F1 circuit. Capital of Victoria State snatched the race from Adelaide

in 1996. Melbourne is now facing taste of its own medicine from Sydney.

Time and Bernie will decide the outcome of this opera.

Button and his Wheel of Fortune!

— Nasir Hameed

Racing regards from California

F1weekly podcast # 415

F1weekly podcast number 415.

Will the Australian Grand Prix bring the excitement back to Formula 1?

Mark Webber goes to the top of the time sheets in Saturday practice.

Motorsports Mondial with Nasir Hameed.

A look at the history of the Australian Grand Prix:

The first Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix was staged in 1985 as the season finale. The first winner here, and scoring his final Grand Prix win, was Keke Rosberg in a Williams Honda.

Jacques Laffite and Philippe Streiff were second and third respectively for Ligier, powered by Renault.

Lotus driver Elio de Angelis was disqualified for starting from the wrong grid position.

The race took place on the streets of Adelaide.

The 1986 Australian Grand Prix is remembered for Nigel Mansell’s championship hopes going up in smoke after tire fire. Both him and teammate Nelson Piquet lost a certain championship to surprise race winner Alain Prost.

In 1987, Gerhard Berger led a Ferrari one two with Michele Alboreto second. Dr Jonathan Palmer, who now runs Brands Hatch and Formula 2 championship, was fourth in his Tyrrell.

In 1988, Alain Prost led a McLaren one two with Ayrton Senna second. This was the last Grand Prix of the turbo era.

The 1989 race had a lot of rain and some surprises. Winner was Thierry Boutsen in a Williams over Alessandro Nannini in a Benetton. Satoru Nakajima was fourth in a Lotus Judd, and believe it not, set the fastest lap of the race.

This is the race which provided the famous video of Ayrton Senna running into the back of his old British F3 buddy Martin Brundle.

Race was stopped at the two hour mark.

1990. Nelson Piquet in a Benetton winning over the Ferraris of Il Leone Nigel Mansell and Alain Prost.

1991. Only 14 of 81 laps were completed when the race was stopped due to heavy downpour. Senna was the winner with Mansell second and Berger third.

1992. Winner was Gerhard Berger in a McLaren. Fastest lap was set by second place driver in a Benetton by the name of Michael Schumacher. And this weekend Ross Brawn will be singing “baby got back”. And I am sure in a competitive car Michael will be Sir Mix A Lot.

Martin Brundle, who will be doing the grid walk for the Beeb on Sunday, was third back in 1992 in his Benetton.

We continue the Australian Grand Prix rapping with the 1993 edition.

Final Grand Prix win in the life and time of Ayrton Senna, his last drive for McLaren before heading for Williams. Alain Prost was second in a Williams ahead of teammate, our Damon, who set the fastest lap. Jean Alesi found some moteevation in land down under and finished fourth in a Ferrari. Rubinho was in this race also, finishing 11th for Eddie Jordan.

1994. Nigel Mansell takes his final win in the final race of the season in a Williams. Berger was second in a Ferrari. Martin Brundle was third in a McLaren Peugeot. Others in this race included Heinz Harald Frentzen, Mika Salo, Alex Zanardi and F1 reject favorite Jean-Denis Deletraz.

Damon Hill was not in the mood to win the world championship and crashed into Michael Schumacher, who, according to Willi Weber, was shell shocked to become the first German weltmeister.

1995. Final race in Adelaide won by Damon Hill in his Williams. Ligier of Olivier Panis was second. In practice Mika Hakkinen survived a near fatal crash. And man who qualified 15th did not start. Luca Badoer.

1996. Race was walk in the park for Williams team in Melbourne. Dramatic Grand Prix debut for Jacques Villeneuve from pole position and second place in the race. Race was won by teammate Damon Hill.

1997. First Grand Prix win for Mercedes powered McLaren driven by DC. David Coulthard. Schumacher second and Hakkinen third.

1998. McLaren one two. Mika over DC.

1999. First Grand Prix win for Eddie Irvine in a Ferrari. Heinz Harald Frentzen was second and Ralf Schumacher third.

Fisico was fourth for Benetton and Rubinho fifth for the wee Scot, Stewart Racing.

Nasir Hameed.

[audio:http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/mp3.f1weekly.com/podcasts/03-25-10f1weekly415.mp3]

Senna

SENNA

Ayrton Senna da Silva, racing legend and three times world champion, was born on March 21, 1960 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. After dominating British Formula Ford and Formula 3 he arrived in Formula 1 with the Toleman team.

Splash in the streets. It was in the rain at Monaco in 1984 that

Senna served notice of his talent and desire to succeed at the top level. A controversial red-flag decision by Jacky Ickx robbed him of victory in what was only his fifth Grand Prix start.

Sutton Images

Two tigers in a den. The “Professor” recommended to Ron Dennis Senna would be a good teammate, a decision he would later regret.

Their rivalry was one of the most intense in Formula 1. “The toughest competitor I ever raced against” is how Prost remembers Senna.

Sutton Images

Red 5 meets Samba sizzle. Senna gets a ride from Mansell, man with whom he fought epic battles like Jerez ’86 and Monaco ’92. Both preferred to be in the gravel than give an inch, like at Spa in ’87 on the opening lap. A truly great and intense racing rivalry.


Sutton Images

The Donington Express. Senna was at his supreme and reigned in the rain. The drive at Monaco ’84 was repeated in similar conditions in ’85 for his first Formula 1 victory in Portugal. “My greatest opening lap” is how he had described his ’93 European Grand Prix performance.

Sutton Images

The karter who would be King. The famous yellow helmet moved fast in the world of karting also. Karting Gurus, Martin Hines and Mike Wilson, karting legend Senna described as the best driver he raced against, had no doubt Senna was special.

— Nasir Hameed

Racing regards from California

Motorsports Mondial

Peugeot take an easy 1-2 victory at the Sebring 12 hours.

Pos  Cl   Drivers                        Car                     Time/Gap
 1.  P1   Gene/Wurz/Davidson             Peugeot            12h00m54.362s
 2.  P1   Lamy/Bourdais/Minassian        Peugeot                + 13.817s
 3.  P1   Mucke/Primat/Fernandez         Lola-Aston Martin       + 3 laps
 4.  P2   Pickett/Graf/Maassen           Porsche                + 14 laps
 5.  P2   Brabham/Pagenaud/Franchitti    HPD                    + 18 laps
 6.  GT2  Melo/Bruni/Kaffer              Ferrari                + 36 laps
 7.  GT2  Auberlen/Milner/Werner         BMW                    + 37 laps
 8.  GT2  Muller/Hand/Priaulx            BMW                    + 37 laps
 9.  GT2  Bergmeister/Long/Lieb          Porsche                + 38 laps
10.  PC   Tucker/Bouchut/Wilkins         ORECA                  + 40 laps
11.  GT2  Law/Neiman/Lietz               Porsche                + 42 laps
12.  P1   Drayson/Cocker/Pirro           Lola                   + 43 laps
13.  GT2  Brown/Cosmo/Barbosa            Ferrari                + 44 laps
14.  GT2  Krohn/Jonsson/van de Poele     Ferrari                + 46 laps
15.  GT2  Magnussen/O'Connell/Garcia     Corvette               + 47 laps
16.  GT2  Beretta/Gavin/Collard          Corvette               + 47 laps
17.  PC   Zugel/Jeannette/Julian         ORECA                  + 56 laps
18.  GTC  Gonzalez/Leitzinger/Keen       Porsche                + 59 laps
19.  GTC  Sweedler/Kapudija/Lueders      Porsche                + 62 laps
20.  GTC  Gonzalez/Diaz/Kelly            Porsche                + 63 laps
21.  P2   Dyson/Smith/Meyrick            Lola-Mazda             + 64 laps
22.  GTC  Rodriguez/Bieker/Friedman      Porsche                + 65 laps
23.  GT2  Robertson/Robertson/Murry      Doran Ford             + 67 laps
24.  GTC  Lewis/Vento/Aschenbach         Porsche                + 68 laps
25.  GTC  Richard/Ende/Lally             Porsche                + 85 laps
26.  PC   Wallace/Sutherland/Hildebrand  ORECA                  + 86 laps
27.  GTC  Curtis/Sofronas/Pilgrim        Porsche                + 87 laps
28.  GT2  Sharp/van Overbeek/Farnbacher  Ferrari                + 96 laps
29.  GT2  Sellers/Henzler/Pilet          Porsche               + 112 laps
30.  PC   Feinberg/Marcelli/Weickardt    ORECA                 + 133 laps
31.  PC   Pagerey/Wong/Ducote            ORECA                 + 135 laps
32.  PC   Tucker/Hunter-Reay/Gue         ORECA                 + 143 laps
33.  GT2  Gentilozzi/Goossens/Dalziel    Jaguar                + 356 laps
34.  P1   Willman/Burgess/Ehret          Lola                  + 367 laps

F1weekly podcast # 414

Daniel Morad

Rock Solid Racer

Daniel Morad is a talented young racing driver from Toronto. He was born on April 24, 1990. After a successful karting career, he won the Formula BMW US Championship in 2007, and was placed fourth in the Formula BMW world finals in Valencia.

He has also raced in Formula Atlantic and A1GP competition.

Podcast 414 features an exclusive conversation with this talented driver.


Testing the GP3 car at Circuit Paul Ricard earlier this month

Morad will soon announce his racing plans for the 2010 season. Meantime, we invite you to visit his website www.danielmorad.com for more information on his career.

[audio:http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/mp3.f1weekly.com/podcasts/03-18-10f1weekly414.mp3]