Category Archives: Podcast

F1Weekly podcast # 722

NASIR BRINGS BACK MORE INTERVIEWS FROM THE INDYCAR SERIES OPENER IN ST. PETERBURG FLORIDA AND THE 12 HOURS OF SEBRING. ON THIS EPISODE WE FEATURE AN INTERVEW WITH INDYCAR OWNER DALE COYNE AND…HERE ARE SOME WORDS FROM PADDY LOWE ON THE F1 SEASON OPENER DOWN UNDER.

Paddy Lowe:
It is an exciting time of year for everyone in Formula One including the huge number of fans around the world, as we head to Australia for the first race of the season. This year is particularly exciting as the regulations have changed substantially concerning the bodywork of the cars and the dimensions of the tyres, so we expect to see quicker cars and far more challenging racing for the drivers.

Coming back to the paddock has that feeling of being “back to school” after our winter away: everybody energised for the new season ahead, meeting friends again and welcoming new faces. I always feel that the first qualifying session of the year is the most intense and interesting hour in the entire Formula One calendar, as that is the point when all the smoke and mirrors of winter testing must stop and the real pace is finally put on the table. It is only then that we will see how the cars and drivers perform and get our first true indication of the season which will unfold.

The race itself is always eventful with more than the usual degree of incident and car failure as the cars and drivers engage in their first competition of the year. And the spectators bring extra enthusiasm to Albert Park, many of them having come from all over the world to see this first race of the F1 season. From a technical point of view, the tyres for this year’s race are not only wider but also softer – having the ultrasoft in play at Melbourne for the first time – so we will without doubt see some record breaking lap times this weekend and perhaps more evidence of driver fatigue in the race than we have seen in recent years.

For me personally, I’m very happy to be back at Williams, the team where I started my Formula One career. We have a very talented group of people here and two great drivers with whom I haven’t worked before, so I’m looking forward to stepping into the paddock with them in Melbourne to start the 2017 season.

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F1Weekly podcast # 721

JOHN SURTEES PASSED AWAY MARCH 10, 2017

NASIR HAMEED ACCEPTED AN INVITATION TO HAVE A CONVERSATION AND A CUP OF TEA WITH JOHN SURTEES IN THE SPRING OF 2016. ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON PODCAST # 706 PART 1 AND PODCAST # 707 PART 2. F1W IS BRINGING BACK THE INTERVIEW IN IT’S ENTIRETY WITH PODCAST # 721

John Surtees, CBE (born 11 February 1934) is a British former Grand Prix motorcycle road racer and Formula One driver. He is a four-time 500cc motorcycle World Champion – winning that title in 1956, 1958, 1959 and 1960 – the Formula One World Champion in 1964, and remains the only person to have won World Championships on both two and four wheels. He founded the Surtees Racing Organisation team that competed as a constructor in Formula One, Formula 2 and Formula 5000 from 1970 to 1978. He is also the ambassador of the Racing Steps Foundation.

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F1Weekly podcast # 720

NASIR IS JUST AS DISAPPOINTED AS THE HOST ON THE FACT THAT ANOTHER FORMULA 1 SEASON WILL LEAVE FERNANDO WITHOUT A WIN OR EVEN A PODIUM. THE SHARK FINS HAVE TO GO! AND WILL BOTAS BEAT LCH.

HERE ARE SOME WORDS FROM DANIEL RICCIARDO ON BARCELONA TEST 2…

Formula One’s second and final test of pre-season got underway in Barcelona, with Daniel Ricciardo returning to the cockpit of the RB13. And it was a productive day for the team, with the Australian putting 89 laps on the board and recording the day’s second quickest time. Daniel’s lap of 1:19.900 was set just before the lunch break on ultrasoft tyres as the team spent the morning focusing on shorter runs before longer stints in the afternoon.

“I felt we performed well on the softs this morning and we did quite a few good runs on that. We were also able to start doing some performance runs today. We tried the softer compounds and while my best time was on the ultrasoft it was actually not much quicker than the soft. I think we learned something from that. Generally I’m happy with what we got out of this morning and in terms of where we were last week I feel like the car is starting to come alive more. This afternoon we focused more on longer runs. We only got a few in, but it was enough to know how the tyres work after a few laps. We definitely feel we can still get more out of the car – I think everyone can – but it’s looking alright. It’s now my third day in the car and from day one to day two and now day three, I’m more and more happy with it.”

Head of Race Engineering Guillaume Rocquelin said: “I’d call that a very productive day’s work. In fact, it was pretty much working through the kind of programme we’d normally run on a Friday of a race weekend – so, shorter runs in the morning to focus on working with tyre compounds and then longer runs in the afternoon. Without the benefit of a shakedown before putting the car on track last week we were slightly at the mercy of whatever niggles presented themselves, and a couple did, but over the weekend we put some permanent fixes in place and that enabled us to have a really solid day today. Daniel went wide a couple of times – I think he was enjoying himself – so we had a few bits and pieces that needed repairing before the afternoon runs but they were purely cosmetic, so not a major issue. In terms of the times, they’re still not of great importance, but I’d say we may have slightly underperformed on the softer compounds, so there’s more to come I think.”

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F1Weekly podcast #719

CLARK AND NASIR ARE OVER THE MOON WITH THE SPECIAL INTERVIEW OF FERNANDO ALONSO’S FORMER TEAM MATE… GIANCARLO FISICHELLA FROM THE DAYTONA 24 HOURS RACE LAST WEEKEND.

Minardi (1996)

In 1996, he made the move to Formula One, making his debut for the Minardi team, after being the official test driver the previous season. However he did not complete the full season since Minardi required a driver who could bring funding to the team, and replaced Fisichella with Giovanni Lavaggi.

Jordan (1997)

For 1997 he made the move to Eddie Jordan’s eponymous team, where he drove alongside former F1 champion Michael Schumacher’s brother Ralf, himself a former Formula Nippon champion. Fisichella gained his first podium finish at the 1997 Canadian Grand Prix, and went on to finish higher in the points standings than his team-mate. At Hockenheim a victory looked to be within reach for Fisichella, but a puncture and the performance of an on-form Gerhard Berger denied him the win. Fisichella was able to show his talent again at the rain-soaked Belgian Grand Prix in which he finished a commendable second behind Michael Schumacher. Following this race, the Benetton team signed him for 1998.

Benetton (1998–2001)

Fisichella driving for Benetton at the 1999 Canadian Grand Prix.

The timing of his move to Benetton move was unfortunate. Following Renault’s withdrawal from Formula One, Benetton would contest the 1998 season without “works” (factory-supplied) engines, instead using rebranded development versions of 1997 Renault engines. Despite not having the latest engines, Fisichella still managed second places at Montreal and Monaco, even being in contention for a victory in Canada until gearbox problems slowed him down. In Austria, Fisichella scored his first pole position, although an on-track clash with Jean Alesi during the race cost him any chance of a good result. He was then able to add only two more points to his total in the second half of the year as Benetton lost ground on their competition.

1999 proved to be a similarly inconsistent season for Giancarlo Fisichella. He did score some points finishes, including second at Montreal, and again came close to a victory in the European Grand Prix, until he spun off whilst in the lead. This would prove to be his best chance of a victory for the next few seasons.

Fisichella’s season was to follow a similar pattern in 2000. He again gained some surprise podium finishes early in the year, but Benetton’s now unfortunately traditional poor second half of the season meant that he failed to score any more points. Since joining Benetton, Fisichella had comprehensively outperformed his Austrian team-mate Alexander Wurz, who would then leave the team to make way for British rookie Jenson Button in 2001. Renault had purchased the Benetton team by the start of the 2001 season, but their investment was too late to enable much progress with Benetton’s uncompetitive 2001 car, and as a result, Fisichella was battling for much of the season with teams such as Minardi and Prost. However, the efforts of technical director Mike Gascoyne and his staff did result in improvements over the year, culminating in a 4-5 finish at the German Grand Prix and a third-place finish for Fisichella at the Belgian race. Despite Fisichella gaining the team’s best results that season and consistently outperforming Button, he was not retained by the team, so he rejoined Jordan for 2002.

Jordan (2002–2003)

Fisichella driving for Jordan at the 2002 US GP.

Fisichella managed to score just seven points in 2002, comfortably outpacing new teammate Takuma Sato, although the Jordan-Honda car of that year was never truly competitive. After Honda withdrew their engine supply, Jordan switched to Ford engines for the 2003 season, but the team were still unable to compete with the top teams on the grid. Despite this lack of performance, Fisichella won his first race at the Brazilian Grand Prix.

Battling with McLaren’s Kimi Räikkönen amidst heavy rain and numerous crashes, Fisichella took the race lead on lap 54, soon before the race was red-flagged. However, he was demoted to second place on the podium, because (per regulations) Räikkönen was the race leader two laps prior to the red flag. Several days later, though, the FIA determined that Fisichella had already begun his 56th lap before the red flag, meaning that he, and not Räikkönen, had been leading the race two laps before its premature end, awarding the Italian his first F1 victory. Fisichella was the only F1 driver to have won a race without having stood atop the podium. He collected the winner’s trophy at the next race at Imola.[2] Fisichella’s only other points finish of 2003 was to be a seventh place at Indianapolis.

Sauber (2004)

Fisichella driving for Sauber at the 2004 US GP.

Unhappy at the Jordan team’s performance, Fisichella moved to Sauber in 2004 in the hope of greater results, and of using the team as a way of gaining access to, and a drive for, 2003 World Champions Ferrari, who supplied re-badged engines to the Sauber team. Fisichella drove well all year, comfortably outpacing team mate Felipe Massa for much of the season (scoring 22 championship points vs Massa’s 12).

Renault (2005–2007)

Fisichella at the 2005 United States Grand Prix.

His strong performances prompted former Benetton-Renault team boss Flavio Briatore to re-sign him for the 2005 season as partner to the young Spanish driver Fernando Alonso. A win at the season opening race at Melbourne signalled the Formula One breakthrough that commentators had been predicting, but it proved to be something of a false dawn. A run of poor luck saw Fisichella fall behind his team mate in the championship standings, and at times the pair were achieving noticeably different lap times with the same equipment. It appeared that Fisichella simply did not have the pace to match Alonso.

The difference in pace between Fisichella and Alonso was noticeable, and while Alonso’s metronomic consistency helped him win the 2005 championship, Fisichella’s general bad luck was to cost him points finishes. He was overtaken and lost the lead on the final lap of the Japanese Grand Prix by McLaren driver Kimi Räikkönen, despite his race engineer urging him to avoid letting Räikkönen past. Nevertheless, his performances alongside Alonso throughout the season enabled Renault to win the World Constructors’ Championship ahead of McLaren and Ferrari, the team that had won that title the previous six seasons.

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F1Weekly podcast # 718

CLARK AND NASIR ARE STILL REMINISCING ON THE 2016 RACING SEASON SAYING GOODBYE TO BERNIE AND SHARING THEIR HOPE ON A POSSIBLY GREAT 2017 F1 SEASON. CLARK IS ALSO EXCITED ABOUT RENAULT ENTERING FOUR R8 GORDINI’S IN THE 2017 RALLYE MONTE CARLO HISTORIQUE!!

Barcelona, January 25, 2017 – Renault today announced it will take part in the Rallye Monte-Carlo Historique 2017 involving four teams at the wheel of Renault 8 Gordinis:

  • Team n°5: Manu Guigou / Jean-Pierre Prevot
  • Team n°8: Jean Ragnotti / Sebastien Delanney
  • Team n°12: Michel Leclere / Michel Duvernay
  • Team n°14: Guillaume Chancel / François-Paul Forgeoux
The Renault 8 Gordini, a legend!

Few cars can have made such an impact during their time as the Renault 8 Gordini, prompting Renault to enter Renault 8 Gordinis in this competition. This was one the most popular sports models ever made by Renault, offering a top speed of 175 km/h at a very affordable price.

The Renault 8 Gordini appeared in 1964 to open up the thrill of sports driving to a whole generation. Though the “Gorde”, as it was affectionately known, was based on the Renault 8 Major, racetrack modifications at the hand of wizard Amédée Gordini left it largely unrecognisable.

Nothing was done halfway: the original model’s sensible engine was transfigured to squeeze out almost twice the power, with changes like a new cylinder head and two splendid Weber carburetors. Then the suspension, steering, brakes and equipment were upgraded to achieve a the top speed of 175 km/h. Visual signs of this remarkable sporting aptitude included round instrument dials and a smart blue finish with white stripes. The 1108 cc engine of the initial release gave way to a 1255 cc unit with the 1966 facelift, which also brought in the tell-tale dual headlamps. The Gordini Cup, introduced the same year, went a long way to developing the Renault 8 Gordini myth, consolidating its reputation with an impressive list of racing honours. Many racing drivers learned their craft at the wheel of a Renault 8 Gordini, and hold very fond memories of it. In 1970, the great little Renault 8 Gordini finally gave way to a Renault 12 model bearing the same name.

The four Renault 8 Gordinis entered by Renault are equipped with Michelin X M + S 89 tyres of dimensions 135X15 which have already proved their efficiency in previous editions.

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F1Weekly podcast #717

CLARK AND NASIR REVIEW THE SECOND HALF OF THE 2016 FORMULA 1 SEASON AND SHARE THEIR HOPE AND ASPIRATIONS FOR THE 2017 SEASON

ON ANOTHER NOTE WILLIAMS MARTINI RACING CONFIRM LANCE STROLL AT THE AUTOSPORT SHOW.

Williams is delighted to announce that Lance Stroll, who will race for WILLIAMS MARTINI RACING in the 2017 Formula One World Championship, will be appearing at this year’s Autosport Show (12th – 15th January 2017, NEC, Birmingham).
The Canadian will be taking to the Autosport International stage on Saturday 14th January, whilst Deputy Team Principal Claire Williams and Head of Performance Engineering Rob Smedley will be interviewed on Sunday 15thJanuary.
Stroll, who joins Williams following a dominant championship-winning year in European Formula 3, will be on stage to discuss his thoughts ahead of his first Formula One campaign.
Williams has already announced its plans to create a unique and interactive centrepiece for the Autosport Show in celebration of its 40th anniversary in Formula One, where fans will be transported through the British team’s 40-year history.
Claire Williams, Williams Martini Racing Deputy Team Principal, said: “We are pleased to confirm that Lance Stroll and Rob Smedley will be joining our 40th anniversary celebrations at Autosport International. It’s a great opportunity for fans to hear from Lance, and meet him, before he takes to the grid for the first time in Australia.”
Tickets for the event are on sale now and can be purchased from: http://www.autosportinternational.com. Tickets for Williams’ experiential centrepiece are also available for a charitable donation to Williams Martini Racing’s official charity partner, the Spinal Injuries Association, which supports those affected by spinal cord injuries.

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